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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
't. and many of those who don't tend to be the young people. and jonathan is this young boy who, when you meet him, is essentially homeless. >> yeah. he's living -- >> and very troubled. >> living on the street, sleeping in an alley when i first peat him. having run -- meet him. having run away from a township known as atlantis. not the miraculous place, but rather a very real place that was part of the formal process of apartheid was removing people, eliminating the black spots from places like capetown. people were pushed out, in this case about 40 miles away from capetown, concentrated in areas where there was no industry ask the rest of it. -- and the rest of it. so we understand what spatial apartheid looks like in chicago. formal apartheid in which that kind of separation was imposed by law. and be as a result of that, predictable results. the only industry there is the drug industry which jonathan had come up in. his step dad was a big dealer, and he had run away to the streets. so he becomes, in a way, the story intended to explain to people why south africa's still such a violent plac
's busiest commuter rail line. jonathan martin joins us from the crash site. and jonathan, i believe we are standing by to get an update on the investigation soon >> reporter: that's right, tony. we are expecting a news conference in the ntsb at 4:00 o'clock. so any minute, we will learn something. hopefully, as you mentioned, the investigators do have those two black boxes, the black box data recorders. one from the front of the train. one from the back. that hopefully will allow them to learn some information about what caused this deadly crash. tony, the big questions really out there at this point are: you know, was this caused by a mechanical error, operator error or possibly something else? maybe something with the tracks. now, the train's conductor who was injured, himself, in this derailment has said that there was an issue, possibly with the braking system. but these recorders are really significant because they can tell investigators down to the second what was going on with the air pressure in the braking system. so they will be able to tell to the one-second intervals whethe
colleague jonathan capehart actually pointed out this week, autopsies are done on dead things. so there you go. joining me now is msnbc contributor and "washington post" opinion writer, jonathan capehart. staff writer for par dor pandor daily, david sirota. you guys generally do pretty well talking to women. let's take it step by step, okay? >> okay. >> all right. here's the thing about women. no matter the message, it's the policies. like, they still just don't seem to get that. if we, you know, if we look at them -- i just want to play something ken blackwell actually said this morn ing. i don't think he got the sensitivity memo, though. >> at the end of the day, republicans don't have a problem working and talking with women. we control 30 of the governorships. we control 26 state houses and -- and senate chambers. you know, we, in fact, know how to speak to women on their policy issues. >> okay. so the message i took away from that was, like, we don't have to know how to talk to women because we're in control. basically. if you look at, jonathan, what's been going on at the state level
in our economy. >> joining me today, "washington post" columnist jonathan capehart, former white house press secretary and founding partner off-almost said founding father -- founding father and partner of inside agency robert gibbs, congressional reporter for buzz feed and political reporter and white house correspondent at the "huffington post" sam stein. we talked a lot about the pizza versus the pizza box. after the gop autopsy, the republican conviction they didn't actually need to change the product they were selling, they just needed to change the marketing. it's unbelievable me, the whole 47% thing clearly has not made a dent. nowhere do you see that in a more pronounced fashion than republican talking points on unemployment. >> largely, if you ask most members of the gop, 47% to them wasn't a gaffe, it's a belief. i heard it in debates i had with people all of last year before the tape was uncovered. i do think, look, this is one of those things that the republicans will either learn this the easy way or the hard way. i remember watching these debates about unemployment insura
>> hello and welcome to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz in new york. parliament calls for new elections. protestors say that's not enough. in ukraine, a symbolic gesture. as protestors topple a statute of a hero. >>> and early venezuelan elections, as that country struggles. tonight the crisis deepens in thailand. the prime minister suddenly dissolves parliament and is calling for new elections. picture of thousands rallying in the capitol where it is 11:00 in the morning. opposition party resigns from conflict. and the conflict is not over yet. wayne hay has the latest. >>> there is no indication that the prime minister will dissolve parliament, that they will change their goals. those goals have in fact changed a bit over the past few weeks. at first they said they would accept house dissolution. that quickly changed into their goal being the removal of the regime, referring to the former prime minister who was ousted in 2006 and lives in self proclaimed compile. his sister is now prime minister. they say the government is corrupt, this current government is corrupt and only
york, msnbc political analyst, jonathan alder, and in washington, msnbc analyst and former rnc chairman, michael steele. and who is never grinchly, michael steele. >> no, never. >> in the spirit of the holiday season, i would like you to tell us, as we're 11 or 12 days before the next recess, what have the republican members of congress, other than throwing a lot of shade at healthcare.gov, what have they fliaccomplished 2013? >> not a lot. that's obvious. this congress has done very, very little. there are eight working days left in its year. and, you know, at the end of the day, they're going to have to look back and go to their constituencies and account for that in some manner, i'm sure, going into next cycle. yes, there's been a lot of noise around obama care. and its launch in october. and the failures that float from that. but as you know, joy, i've said from the very beginning of this year that, you know, the party has an opportunity to put some real -- substantive policy on the table to differentiate itself not just rhetorically from this administration, but, you know, and poli
for sure why it de-railed. let's take you to jonathan martin. he is at the crash site in the bronx. jonathan? >> reporter: hey, tony. you know, investigators have said from the start that this is a very preliminary information, but as you mentioned, these two black box data recorders have revealed key information. one frust from the front and one from the back, showing this train was going too fast echoing what a lot of these passengers and witnesses have been saying from the start. >> reporter: investigators with the national transportation safety board say they now know the commuter train that de-railed was going too fast as it approached a curve. >> the preliminary information and let me emphasize this is preliminary information from the event recorders shows that the train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30-mile-an-hour curve. >> investigators say it's too early to know if speeding was caused by operator or mechanical error like an issue with the brakes. >> we don't know whether the brakes went to zero pressure because of a valve change or be
, "washington post" columnist jonathan capehart, former democratic congressman harold ford, jr. joining us from washington nbc's capitol hill correspondent luke russert. luke, i can't believe i'm saying the words government shut down and debt ceiling debacle once again, my friend. what are the chances that the two waring sides get together to pass a budget deal in the next two weeks? >> well, you'd think it would be good after what happened to congress's approval during the last shutdown fight and argument, especially for house republicans. but as of right now it doesn't necessarily have a very rosey outlook. there's been all this talk that paul ryan, the republican from wisconsin and patty murray, democrat from washington chairing this conference committee will figure out some way to lessen the impact of the sequester. as far as a wide reaching grand bargain, that's not going to happen. now they are trying to figure out, okay, what can we do to replace sequester cuts a lot of democrats and republicans don't like in the pentagon but still make it revenue neutral so republicans don't jump off th
have a moral obligation to pay more than the wage. father jonathan morris is here to weigh in on that. $15 an hour, tax the rich, you must have health insurance or else. here is my take on the command economy. that's what it is. the left quarterbacked by president obama is trying to command the return of prosperity, command fairness, with an of a magic wand and command the economy to obey the white house. look at the $15 an hour movement. they want to legislate wages. it's not what you bring to the wage table, it's what politicians decree you should be paying, that's a command. look at the tax the rich idea. and that's an attempt to command income equality. wave that wand, make them pay, even more, and they tell you we will be all more equal. really? and how has that been going for the las five years. and then obamacare, perhaps the new motherload of the command economy, you shall have health insurance. you will give us your personal information, and stop whining if we lose it. you had enough of this yet? you see, it doesn't work. command economies do not produce widespread prosperity
with me is ron allen and joining us is jonathan alter, author and msnbc contributor, and james peterson, professor at lehigh university. jonathan, let me go to you first. you've covered president obama extensively. what kind of mandela influence do you see in him? >> huge influence. as he president said in his statement. he said he would not be who he was without nelson mandela. he followed him from an early age. you may recall when the president was a student at occidental college in california, he took part in anti-apartheid demonstrations. he was a leader on that issue and focused on it. but one of the things that is really striking me tonight is what can americans learn. and american society learn from the example of nelson mandela? i think back to civil rights movement, ghandi with his principle of civil disobedience, that helped to give the movement life. so what is mandela's message? well, today we're hearing even very conservative senators and other figures talking about the spirit of forgiveness that he embody embodied in south africa. my question tonight, rev, is can we import
and reconciliation was all about. a very powerful thing for this young journalist. jonathan hunt was at the time working in great britain. you have covered his life for much of your career. >> extraordinary man. to pick up on the themes of everybody including president barack obama himself of the forgiveness and reconciliation. i think there are two particular acts which stand out in my mind. first was in 1994, after he was inago ra inago rated first thing he did was have tea with a woman betsy, widow of the architect of the par tide, the most bitter enemy of the black population of south africa. nelson mandela sat and had tea with that man's widow. it was an extraordinary act. in 1995 moving forward. we talk about the unity coming to people from sports. rugby in south africa is not stretching it much to say it's a religion. it was always an entirely white religion, the most important sport in south africa. the 1995 world rugby cup a warded to south africa for the ending of a par tide. it was still almost entirely whites in the sport. nelson mandela in the absolutely unthinkable act just a i fe
the people next to us begging for money and he said that that's okay for them to beg. >> so, jonathan, telling a kid to beg begs this question. are we teaching our kids to be takers instead of makers? >> kids and man in general are inclined to trade, not to beg. we're the thinking animal we want to trade value for value, not conquer and beg and ask for favors from other people. this young girl, this young person just like a lot of young people whether it's lemonade stands or roadside sales, they're excited about the idea of making something and having somebody pay them for it. those are the type of values we should be teaching, independence, self reliance, not more dependency from uncle sam. >> can you believe that park ranger told her she couldn't sell her mistletoe? >> it's ridiculous. we should be promoting these kinds of things in is great this girl did this. unfortunately i will not be surprised if we find out uncle sam comes knocking on her door next year asking for money. this perfectly reflects what's wrong in this country right now. there are too many rules, too many regulati
of the story. here with reaction, sara schaeffer and capitalist pig jonathan hoenig. fox news contributor. what do you think of that? >> i think councilman we have a serious problem of poverty in the district of columbia. i drove bit shelter on way to the studio. where he is wrong and misguided unfortunately that boosting the minimum wage doesn't make those low-skilled workers anymore valuable to the labor market. it mines places like walmart as you suggested are going to hire fewer people. it especially bad for young, unskilled workers. they're not simply looking for compensation. they're look for skills so they can then get the next job. i think that's a gross oversight. melissa: see, jonathan, i totally, when he says, you couldn't live on this wage, you couldn't support your family on this wage, that is abs absolutely true. i don't think anyone argues that. the problem this is a wage you earn to get started in the system working and then over time you're supposed to gain the skills and education to move out and do something else. the problem is, the very few people who get stuck as a career
>> this is al jazeera america, live from new york. i am jonathan betz. [ music ] >> a day of prayer and reflexion for nelson mandela. services are held in south africa and half a world away in the u.s. to honor his legacy. >> linennon comes krarning down >> peace keepers in the central contr control. >> massive problems in the midwest, a big winter storm pushes towards the east coast. [ music ] >> we begin tonight with a national day of prayer for the man called south africa's greatest son, nelson mandela was the topic in pulpits around the world today. services of all face honored the former president. a steady flow of more thurners candles and stood with others praying for the civil rights leader. there were scenes like this across sfrikdz today. more now from al jazeera nick schifrin. >> nelson mandela talked about a rainbo nation. his struggle wasn't on behalf of black south africans but on behalf of all segregated and humiliated by racist rulers. >> nelson mandela wanted to build a nation united in diversity. citizens of all races and religion say mandela created that had unity
, jonathan grub rn, professor of economics. he helped craft the affordable care act, and michael smerconish, an msnbc contributor. michael, i want to start with you. you have been struggling dealing with this affordable care act, trying to get coverage for you and your family. but it sound like you had something of a breakthrough today. >> i have had a horrific experience since october 1st, lawrence. in fact, i remember naively waking up at 5:00 a.m. on the day of the launch, thinking i would go on the site, explore my options, go on the radio and say here they are for my family of five. for eight weeks, could not get any satisfaction online until today. i'm online right now in real time, in fact, i don't think you'll bow able to see it too clearly -- >> hold it up, we'll try. >> all right, there are the 24 plans that are now available for my wife and me and our three sons. our daughter is about to hit 26, so she'll no longer be on the plan, but i can tell you i have 24 plans available to me. i'm in pen pep. we don't even have our own exchange. this via the federal exchange. they range on t
post. a political columnist and progressive activist. jonathan, let's peck up that quote we just played for obama there saying next year we will have some sort of bipartisan plan on voting rights. i took a step back. are we sure it's going to be bipartisan? are we sure there will be meaningful bipartisan plan. everything i have seen tells me there may be a plan next year. i'm hard pressed to see where it's bipartisan. >> we are saying an eternally hopeful, optimistic president who knows full well that whoever, and especially he's for it, is going to be impossible to get age done. the republicans have made it clear on any issue from the bucket, economy, jobs, health care, immigration you name it they will stand in the way of quote giving him a win. they don't want him to succeed. as we know, there have been two books wren that republicans collude before he was inaugurated to insure he would not be successful. so a president's job is to be hopeful and optimistic. that's what the president is being here, but that's not to say that he shouldn't try. because the president, while hopeful and
students at byu and jonathan was meeting her family for the first time over the holiday and the wedding is a month from day the jonathan's uncle has faith in the piloting but necessities there is more at issue. >> our concern is they have survived the crash and could be injured but having to survive in ten degree weather at night with snow and no way to keep warm. >> his son, daniel, and his wife were on the plane. daily smith founded serial tek a pioneer so the wear giant. searching begins in an hour. >> in sonoma, efforts are growing for the creation of a park in memory of 13-year-old andy lopez, the board is looking at respecting the lot where lopez was shot while carrying a copy ak-47 by a sheriff deputy in october. the board made a move to putting cameras on deputies to instill trust in the governments and demands by the protesters that the deputy be indicted. >> potential republican candidate is doing better than the rest for voting for president in three years. 47 percent have a favorable view of new jersey governor chris christie. 19 percent see him unfairbly. christie woman re-
to be president and how it's changed him. howard fineman is a political analyst and jonathan capehart is an msnbc contributor. howard, i was really taken with your perception there. i actually missed it because i was so busy trying to prepare myself to follow up. but you hit something in your years of experience, presidents don't talk about what it's like to be me, if you will. >> no, they don't. and they don't do it in public. i mean, i've covered a lot of presidents, chris, and i've gotten to know them pretty upclose. and they are sometimes self-reflective. but usually in private and usually only momentarily. they don't let their guard down very much. but i think in this case in that interview yesterday which i still think was extraordinary, the president was kind of thinking out loud and talking out loud about his situation. let's face it, his poll ratings are down, so he's got three years left in a second term he's not sure what he's going to do with. and i think sometimes he wonders how he's going to muster the motivation to muscle through, as he puts it. that's a phrase he uses. but here he
this country with honor. >> ron reagan is a political analyst and jonathan capehart is an msnbc contributor. ron, this sort of old republican thing here about making fun of people because they're unemployed, i think of factory towns where the factory closes. and it's very hard to imagine just pulling up stakes and heading to some other part of the world to get a job. but that's what i guess rand paul thinks they ought to do quick as hell. and the idea the unemployed want to be unemployed is crazy because everybody hates being unemployed. everybody i met hated it except for a short time, nobody wants to watch television all day when they could be an active part of society and proud of themselves. >> well, it's another example that the republicans or particular republicans of being just counterfactual on the one hand. there are no studies that indicate that, you know, if you receive unemployment, you then don't want to work. and from a common sense point of view, how do you imagine that somebody who's already earned an inadequate salary is now going to be satisfied earning half of that money
of that situation? is that father jonathan? i saw you in the shot there. see you, father jonathan. jon: come out. >> gift for jesus. father jonathan gives his opinion to us next. jon: fox news alert. we're told the president and first lady will be heading to south africa to pay respects to the memory of nelson mandela. he of course died yesterday at the age of 95. the funeral is scheduled for december 15th and the obamas will be attending. >> one of the things that we talked about a lot with nelson mandela is paying it forward. that ties into the next story more than spreading holiday cheer. growing movement, tips for jesus, surprising restaurants and bar servers with tips in the hundreds sometimes thousands of dollars. this one for $5,000 for a $557 drink bill at a bar in michigan. the movement is gaining steam in response to a tip left by a pastor in st. louis, i give god 10%, why should i give you 18? apparently people think that was message for jesus. tips for jesus is doing opposite for that. we have to talk about jesus with somebody who knows bit. father jonathan morris, fox news religion
group of cme. jonathan corpina on floor of new york stock exchange. phil, we'll start with you. gold prices are falling near the lowest levels of the year. $1200 is danger point, right? >> eally is. that is the talk where the nominal cost of production. it had a real hard time, every time it is been below there once. it didn't stay there long. a lot going on. we're looking at economic data here in the u.s., better than expected. mario draghi, didn't sound like the dove we thought he would be. that means less stimulus in europe. gold bulls do not like to hear the talk. we'll wait to see how the jobs report tomorrow is before we get excited about the market. up big yesterday. a bit of a pullback today. adam: we had quite a bit of, understanding about oil yesterday. what is happening with prices. they're on track for another straight day of gains, phil? >> they really are. we're seeing big unwinding right now in the brent wti spread. if you remember last couple weeks it would be buying brent, selling wti, that is all changing. we're getting oil from the gulf coast. down towards the gul
, healthy meals delivered across much of san francisco in a matter of minutes. >> yeah. abc 7's jonathan bloom explains how they do it. >> reporter: steven sea works long hours at a startup. that means no stopping for dinner. >> the one chicken for you -- >> yep. >> reporter: a few weeks ago, this would have been pizza. now -- >> some chicken? with the sauce -- >> reporter: steven stuffing his face with something that's healthy. >> nothing overcooked or anything. >> reporter: it just so happens steven shares an office with sprig, and he's one of their first customers. sprig is dinner on demand. it's an iphone app where you push a button and a healthy meal shows up, usually in about 20 minutes. >> hi. >> thisr you today -- >> reporter: the magic doesn't start when you push the button. it actually started hours earlier when they took a vacuum sealed bag of ingredients and put it into a steaming hot bath of water. in order to change the way your food gets to you, they had to change the way they cook it. >> here's the vacuum serial. >> reporter: nate kellar is the executive chef. he learned
of the people until we restore our freedoms and jonathan. a lot of people out here remember that day. i am here with community activist, you were here in 1990, and it was a special day for you and rah lot of people. >> yes. it's -- i have warm great memories of that crowd. people are very very excited. and our dear brother moved throughout the community. with no poor of the community. and it is quite sad tonight. i am saddened and experience of his passing but i'm hoping that in his passing that our young people become inspired by his life work, and his commitment. to justice and equality and fair treatment of all people. and so that hopefully by the news running these stories and the articles that will appear in magazines that our young people embrace nelson mandela's history and his legacy. and that we can use some of that to empower our young people. that that they will become empowered. so symbolic hoping the same way they did during his visit in 1990. >> correct. we were with talking with mr. billy mitchell. it was special when he came to what are pledge of all places. that people were in
and easier to get. abc7 news reporter jonathan bloom has the story you will only see on abc7 news. >> tyrone has spent hours in rooms like this one wearing head bones and lessening to faint tones made by a big machine. >> i have been wearing hearing aids since in elementary school. >> that might be one were the last times he does this because it isn't a hearing clinic, it's a start-up this you can order online and set up at home. >> we plan to offer an alternative to what's out there. >> he knows all about what is out there. he found the the company that created lyric, the tiny hearing aid you wear all the time. now a new device, i-hear that costs a few hundred dollars instead of a few of several thousands. >> making it more affordable. >> you plug into a website. early test subjects say they like it a lot better than the big ones. >> i hear the fluorescent lights, i here the computers, i hear your watch, i hear everything. >> the parts inside the device are incredibly small. under the microscope you see on the screen the image of the circuit so tiny it's about the advertise of a grain of di
aids dramatically cheaper and easier to get. abc7 news reporter jonathan bloom has the story you will only see on abc7 news. >> tyrone moore has spent hours in rooms like this one wearing headphones made by a big machine. >> i have been wearing hearing aids since in elementary school. >> that might be one were the last times he does this because it isn't a hearing clinic, it's a start-up this you can order online and set up at home. >> we plan to offer an alternative to what's out there. >> he knows all about what is out there. he founded the company that created lyric, the tiny hearing aid you wear all the time. now a new device, i-hear that costs a few hundred dollars instead of a few of several thousands. >> making it more affordable. the hearing aids plug into your computer and guides you through a hearing test and guides you through adjustments. don't let the size fool you. early test subjects say they like it a lot better than the big ones. >> i hear the fluorescent lights, i hear the computers, i hear your watch, i hear everything. >> the parts inside the device are incred
. coming up next, jonathan strong joins us. >> he has a play. he has the soul. >> soul. . >> pope frances pay have a secret life. rumor is he sneaks out of the vatican at night might be true. the pope dresses in regular priests clothes, goes into rome,ed a ministers to the homeless. he won't confirm this, himself. >> oh my god, he's a vigilante vickar coming to the help of those in need. he's the bat-pope. holy, holy, father nation. it all makes so much sense now. he's just like bruce wane. he's a wealthy bachelor who lives alone in a giant mansion and bruce wane has the batmobile while frances has the popemobile. not only that, batman talks to morgan freeman and the pope talks to god, who is also morgan freeman. >> for example past the hour with us. jonathan strong, good to have you on the show. >> good morning. >> we pecked the must red from your piece in the national review you write this about the feud between senator minority leader mitch mcconnell and the heritage foundation. there are some echoes of the message in your book, joe. in this piece. >> their feud has been one of the mos
and a regular on fox. jonathan, good to see you. okay, should the minimum wage be increased and should it be the same across the country, state by state, i'm talking about. if not, what would you base it on, market to market, let's start there, jonathan. >> well, wages are not arbitrary. they're not based on whim and feeling. they're actually based on productivity and the demand for supply and labor. so the wages, resulting in job losses, especially among the fast food works working in this job. and the finding about minimum wage was the determination of the labor department back in 1938 when the first minimum wage was enacted. in effect, it is discrimination, it says to a low skilled worker if you can't produce at $15 an hour you can't produce at all. and of course, it says to the employer you can't hire them either. so it is a lose/lose event for all, and a loss of jobs. >> let's go here, to the heritage foundation, saying increasing memory wage would hurt the jobs and the economy. again, so you seem to agree with that particular proposal? >> and it hurts the workers, as well. i mean
battle. jonathan and i get real on that for maths is to reduce fish are if i speak of the audio on oil sauce to just how unstable the president's position is right now. members of his auntie and that its wings elise and also that the head of his administration resigned and some diplomats or ukraine and the knights for example i do the c o canada. that little one to present these covenants typically chance. in fact he is a little bit different because it looks at the last moment he knew how spooky is that press conference. and now is not he said i spend all this but he's on his threats against anti meat ministers of the year to find a solution to the situation and at the salon and the rope this price tag. this is warmed by the protest their seat won't be close to the cabinet of ministers at the oss the resignation will present its government. john is still a mega bailout because it let iran. in the thai capital to you fresh violent actions continued into the night between anti government protests is in police. angry crowds that even tried to force their way to various government buildin
francisco in a matter of minutes. >> yeah. abc 7's jonathan bloom explains how they do it. >> reporter: steven sea works long hours at a startup. that means no stopping for dinner. >> the one chicken for you -- >> yep. >> reporter: a few weeks ago, this would have been pizza. now -- >> some chicken? with the sauce -- >> reporter: steven stuffing his face with something that's healthy. >> nothing overcooked or anything. >> reporter: it just so happens steven shares an office with sprig, and he's one of their first customers. sprig is dinner on demand. it's an iphone app where you push a button and a healthy meal shows up, usually in about 20 minutes. >> hi. >> this for you today -- >> reporter: the magic doesn't start when you push the button. it actually started hours earlier when they took a vacuum sealed bag of ingredients and put it into a steaming hot bath of water. in order to change the way your food gets to you, they had to change the way they cook it. >> here's the vacuum serial. >> reporter: nate kellar is the executive chef. he learned this when he was executive chef at googl
dramatically cheaper and easier to get. abc7 news reporter jonathan bloom has the story you will only see on abc7 news. >> tyrone moore has spent hours in rooms like this one wearing tones made by a big machine. listening to faint tones made by a big machine. >> i have been wearing hearing aids since in elementary school. >> that might be one were the last times he does this because it isn't a hearing clinic, it's a start-up this you can order online and set up at home. >> we plan to offer an alternative to what's out there. >> he knows all about what is out there. he found the the company that created lyric, the tiny hearing aid you wear all the time. now a new device, i-hear that costs a few hundred dollars instead of a few of several thousands. >> making it more affordable. >> you plug into a website. don't let the size fool you. early test subjects say they like it a lot better than the big ones. >> i hear the fluorescent lights, i hear the computers, i hear your watch, i hear everything. >> the parts inside the device are incredibly small. under the microscope you see on the screen t
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)